Agreement Made In Great Compromise

In the end, even Morris accepted the flawed document that united the United States. “If he considers the current plan to be the best to achieve,” he would “take it with all his mistakes.” Major problems, Morris argued, are at stake: “As this plan moves forward, all other thinking will be set aside, and the big question will be whether or not there should be a national government?” James Madison and Hamilton were two of the leaders of the proportional group. Madison argued that a conspiracy of large states against small states is not realistic, as large states are so different from one another. Hamilton argued that states were artificial units made up of individuals, accusing small state officials of wanting power and not freedom (see history of the U.S. Senate). . . .