Sars Edi User Agreement

In order to maximize efficiency and minimize errors, SARS is legally required to enforce electronic communications. It has many advantages for the user, such as: Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) concerns the electronic transfer of data and the need to report to customs by customs users (such as customs clearance agents or freight forwarders). All of the information mentioned above is available on the SARS website www.sars.gov.za. The Customs and Excise Duties Act, §101A, provides for the electronic transmission of customs information via EDI. A special requirement is that all electronic distributors enter into an exchange agreement with SARS; and successfully meet the requirements of the SARS message exchange test before transactions can be submitted electronically. At the same time, these traders register as authorized electronic traders with customs. Most merchants manage EDI through IT service providers 3rd party. These offer a complete management of supply documentation chain, storage, calculation, track & trace and import/export planning functionality with UN/EDIFACT translation capacity and communication interface with customs. Extensible Markup Language (XML) allows users to define a hierarchical set of tags embedded in a file containing the transmitted information. It is difficult to define XML in a single sentence, because it has a dual function of scripting language and file format. But it is a technology that has developed from HTML, the language used by websites. HTML and XML are file formats that allow you to interact with their user. This function, which allows “interaction”, separates XML from other EDI file formats such as X12 and UN/EDIFACT.

Since EDI is defined as the exchange of data without a human intermediary, XML, with its interactive function, does not always fit into the definition of EDI; Otherwise, the XML format (default) would have been viewed like all other PAR EDI formats. The use of EDI is only possible on the basis of the agreement (also called exchange agreement) between the sender and the recipient regarding the use of codes embedded in each message. These agreements are covered by a set of transactions. Initially, these formats and codes were developed ad hoc, with national standards (e.g. .B. ASCI. . . .